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Thanks to Google Maps It's Impossible to Hide the Millennium Falcon

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Thanks to Google Maps It's Impossible to Hide the Millennium Falcon

It's a little unsettling how effective modern technology is at finding things that are supposed to be kept secret. 

Luckily, in this case, it's the harmless discovery that the Millennium Falcon, used in the upcoming Star Wars film, has been hidden behind some shipping containers on a golf course. 

We can't help but feel that the discovery of the spacecraft is eerily reminiscent of the scouting methods used in WWII before bombing raids of airfields. 

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chrisminett
38 days ago
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Well hidden
Milton Keynes, UK
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The art of transporting Spain’s largest wind turbine blade

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The largest wind turbine blade manufactured in Spain to date, 73.5m (241ft), was transported from the factory to the port in Castellón, Spain on October 20th. LM Wind Power, the manufacturer, filmed the 3.5 hour, 45km (28m) trip show off their product – and made an entertaining mini-film to boot.

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chrisminett
41 days ago
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well that's neat
Milton Keynes, UK
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1 public comment
j_k
38 days ago
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video

Thermostat

7 Comments and 16 Shares
Your problem is so terrible, I worry that, if I help you, I risk drawing the attention of whatever god of technology inflicted it on you.
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chrisminett
41 days ago
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This is the sort of crap that happens to my Dad
Milton Keynes, UK
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6 public comments
daanzu_alt_text_bot
29 days ago
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Your problem is so terrible, I worry that, if I help you, I risk drawing the attention of whatever god of technology inflicted it on you.
DaftDoki
34 days ago
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STEVE!
Seattle
snm77
27 days ago
Now you know why I don't have one.
brico
37 days ago
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Too real
Brooklyn, NY
petrilli
40 days ago
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The future we create.
Arlington, VA
Covarr
41 days ago
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I have a friend who is regularly on both sides of this.
Moses Lake, WA
diannemharris
41 days ago
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This is the stuff that happens to me all the time. Luckily most of the time it is because I'm QA.

Why Single Opt-In? And an Update for Our EU Customers

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Last Tuesday, we announced in an email to our customers that MailChimp is adding single opt-in as an option for email lists, and making it the default setting in new and existing lists starting October 31.

However, we’ve made an important change for MailChimp users located in the European Union: If your primary contact address is in the EU, your existing forms will remain double opt-in. You can change your lists to single opt-in on the Signup Preferences page at any time. After November 3, you’ll also be able to make that change in each list’s settings.

We made this decision after receiving a lot of feedback from EU customers who told us that single opt-in does not align with their business needs in light of the upcoming GDPR and other local requirements. We heard you, and we’re sorry that we caused confusion. Customers located in the EU will receive an email from us today to let them know how we’ve changed the plan.

Please know we are committed to helping our customers get ready for the GDPR. Double opt-in provides additional proof of consent, and we suggest you continue using double opt-in if your business will be subject to the GDPR.

For customers outside the EU, existing forms will still switch to single opt-in on October 31. You can switch back to double opt-in at any time through the Signup Preferences page or in each list’s settings. Going forward, all new lists can be set to double opt-in during the list creation process or in list settings.

Why single opt-in?

We know that some of you are curious about why we’re moving to single opt-in as a default, after having been double opt-in by default for so long. I’m happy to address that.

I run the Research team here at MailChimp, and every 6 weeks we go to a new city and interview small businesses. In those interviews, more and more business owners are bringing up double opt-in. What they’ve been saying is that double opt-in is not an easy journey for their customers. Some go so far as to say that double opt-in is “broken.”

At MailChimp, the idea of making something easy for a customer is core to who we are. When our customers expressed concerns that double opt-in was becoming increasingly ineffective, we decided to dig deeper.

What our data shows

Over the past 5 years, most email service providers have moved their email marketing from double opt-in to single opt-in. But that’s not why we’ve followed suit.

Rather, as the majority of companies have moved to single opt-in, recipients have become re-educated on how email marketing confirmation works. Today, most people don’t expect or look for a double opt-in confirmation message when they subscribe to a newsletter.

Indeed, we’ve seen double-opt in rates within MailChimp slip to 39%. This means 61% of people start but do not finish the double opt-in process.

Some of those email addresses may be misspellings, misdirected forum spam bots, or other problematic subscriptions. But after analysis by our own data scientists, we discovered that the overwhelming majority of those who don’t complete the double opt-in process are legitimate subscribers who no longer anticipate the confirmation message.

This shift in norms has led most of our customers to prefer single opt-in. But since MailChimp has only supported double opt-in in our native signup forms, the only choice for customers who wanted single opt-in has been a custom integration or third-party form. (Our API has supported single opt-in since 2009.) This new default doesn’t affect imports or API calls, which account for 98% of subscriptions entering our system today.

So while we’ll continue to support double opt-in, we’re shifting the behavior of native forms in MailChimp to default to single opt-in. We’re making this change now because we have stronger, more intelligent data-backed systems in place to prevent spam for all of our hosted forms—double and single opt-in—so we don’t expect this to impact deliverability.

Benefits to both

Many of our customers are excited about this change, but we’ve also heard from customers who have concerns about our decision to change the default setting on existing lists. We understand that it adds an extra step for those who want to remain double opt-in, but we wanted to simplify the process for the majority of customers who prefer single opt-in. We’ve tried to make it as easy as possible to keep double opt-in as well, and you can change your settings at any time.

Ultimately, you should decide which opt-in method is best for your business. Single opt-in helps you grow your list and give customers a fluid, user-friendly experience when they sign up for marketing emails. Double opt-in is great for customers who want that extra step to confirm email addresses have a valid, monitored inbox, and it can have a positive impact on open and click rates. Double opt-in can also be used to satisfy local regulations or meet recommended email marketing practices in areas of the world with differing requirements.

Learn more about both options in our Knowledge Base.

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chrisminett
47 days ago
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MailChimp switching to single opt-in by default, but not in EU (GDPR). Interesting stats that only 39% complete the double opt-in process, and forms only account for 2% of subscriptions anyway.
Milton Keynes, UK
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The Poplawski’s Holiday Frights

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After becoming internet-famous for their interactive Christmas lights, the Poplawskis have expanded their festive offerings this year with Holiday Frights, a fiendish collection of spooky decor controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

Poplawski's Holiday Frights Raspberry Pi Halloween

The Poplawskis’ holiday lights

Full of lights and inflatable decorations sprawling across the front lawn, the annual pi-powered Poplawski Christmas setup is something we await eagerly here at Pi Towers. What better way to celebrate the start of the holiday season than by inflating reindeer and flashing fairy lights on another continent?

Poplawski's Holiday Lights Raspberry Pi

image c/o Chris Poplawski

So this year, when an email appeared in our inbox to announce the Holiday Frights Halloween edition, we were over the moon!

Take control

It’s about 5am in Easton, Pennsylvania, but I’m 99% sure the residents of the Poplawski’s Holiday Frights home were fully aware of me endlessly toggling their Halloween decorations  — on, off, on, off — in the process of creating the GIF above.

The decorations of the Poplawski’s Holiday Frights are controlled by a Raspberry Pi which, in turn, takes input from a website. And while we’ve seen many Pi projects with online interfaces controlling real-life devices, we can’t help but have a soft spot for this particular one because of its pretty, flashy lights.

Poplawski's Holiday Frights website Raspberry Pi Halloween

To try out the decorations yourself, go to the Poplawski’s Holiday Frights website. Also make sure to bookmark the site, or follow the Facebook page, for updates on their Christmas edition.

When you’re on the site, you will also see how many other people are currently online. If you’re not alone, the battle over which lights are turned on or off can commence! In case you’re feeling extra generous, you can donate 10¢ to fix the decorations in a state of your choosing for 60 seconds, while also helping the Poplawskis power their lights.

Getting spooky

Have you built something Pi-powered and spooky for Halloween? Make sure to share it with us across our social media accounts or in the comments below.

The post The Poplawski’s Holiday Frights appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

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chrisminett
52 days ago
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So much fun
Milton Keynes, UK
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World’s first floating wind farm goes live in Scotland

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The world’s first floating wind farm is now feeding into Scotland’s electricity grid. The $260M pilot project, majority owned by Statoil, is the first commercial development in the floating wind field. All prior floating wind turbines were research focused.

Floating wind is being developed because 80% of the Europe’s wind resources are located in water too deep for traditional fixed bottom wind turbines to reach. Additionally, just west of Europe, in the North Atlantic, there is enough wind to power the entire world.

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chrisminett
60 days ago
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The numbers in dimensions, etc are so large as to be incomprehensible!
Milton Keynes, UK
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